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National Tampu System

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A sign common on the Wechua royal roads alerting of a tempu stop 5 km ahead.

The National Tampu System (Wechua: tampu, "inn") is a system of rest stops, administrative, and military buildings along the routes of the Qhapaq Ñan, the system of royal roads in the Wechua Nation. When Alduria and the Wechua Nation united in a Federation in 1865 AN, the National Tampu System was extended to include the entire country as part of the New Prosperity Plan. They are typically maintained and funded by the regional governments, but sometimes municipal governments also are included in maintaining and funding stops in their jurisdictions.

Tampus typically consist of mostly non-commercial facilities that provide, at a minimum, parking, a law enforcement station (be it local or federal), and restrooms. Some may have information kiosks, vending machines, and picnic areas, but little else, while some have "dump" facilities where recreational vehicles may empty sewage holding tanks. Some stations also include checkpoints to inspect vehicular weights.

When Alduria and the Wechua Nation united in a Federation in 1865 AN, the National Tampu System was extended to include the entire country as part of the New Prosperity Plan. They are typically maintained and funded by the regional governments, but sometimes municipal governments also are included in maintaining and funding stops in their jurisdictions.

The region of the Wechua Nation has local laws that specifically prohibit private retailers from occupying rest stops. A federal statute passed by the Federal Constituent Assembly also prohibits regions and local governments from allowing private businesses to occupy rest areas along federal highways. The original reason for this clause was to protect small towns that had economies dependent on providing roadside services such as gasoline, food, and lodging. The standard practice is that private businesses must buy up land near existing exits and build their own facilities to serve travelers. Such facilities often have tall signs that can be seen from several miles away (so that travelers have adequate time to make a decision). In turn, it is somewhat harder to visit such private facilities, because one has to first exit the freeway and navigate through several intersections to reach a desired business's parking lot, rather than exit directly into a rest area's parking lot. Public rest areas are usually (but not always) positioned so as not to compete with private businesses. Also, it is common practice for governments in Alduria-Wechua to preserve the right of way grants along federal highways for national security, environmental conservation, or for the expansion of local rail and transport lines.