Difference between revisions of "National Credit System"

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(The System)
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Government planners have reported that it will assign a credit rating to every Caputian citizen or resident based on government data about their economic and social status. The system will also include ratings for businesses that operate in the Caputian marketplace.
 
Government planners have reported that it will assign a credit rating to every Caputian citizen or resident based on government data about their economic and social status. The system will also include ratings for businesses that operate in the Caputian marketplace.
  
Critics say it is a mass surveillance tool and uses big data analysis technology.
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Critics say it is a mass surveillance tool, using big data analysis technology to give citizens ratings based on their spending behavior, cultural choices, social media and internet profiles, internet browsing history, and text messaging.
  
 
==The System==
 
==The System==
Caputian Government planners have explained that the National Credit System will focus on four areas: "honesty in government affairs", "commercial integrity", "societal integrity", and "judicial credibility".
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Caputian Government planners have explained that the National Credit System will focus on four areas: "honesty in government affairs", "commercial integrity", "societal integrity", and "judicial credibility".  
  
As of 1658, no comprehensive, nation-wide national credit system exists, and very little firm information is available about how this system might work in practice. There are, however, multiple pilots testing the system on a local level as well as in specific sectors of industry. One such program has been implemented in Zalae through an application that can be used on computers or mobile phones called iHonest, which uses facial recognition software to browse government records and rates users accordingly. Some reports have stated that the ratings may use information gathered from citizens' online behavior.
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A private group commissioned by the Prime Minister, the [[Council for Internal Affairs]], is tasked with developing policies and regulation to establish the system.
 +
 
 +
As of 1658, no comprehensive, nation-wide national credit system exists, and very little firm information is available about how this system might work in practice. There are, however, multiple pilots testing the system on a local level as well as in specific sectors of industry. One such program has been implemented in Zalae through an application that can be used on computers or mobile phones called [[iHonest]], which uses facial recognition software to browse government records and rates users accordingly. Some reports have stated that the ratings may use information gathered from citizens' internet behavior.
  
 
[[Category: Caputia]]
 
[[Category: Caputia]]

Revision as of 02:16, 18 March 2018

The logo of the proposed National Credit System.

The National Credit System is a proposed Caputian Government initiative for developing a national reputation system.

Government planners have reported that it will assign a credit rating to every Caputian citizen or resident based on government data about their economic and social status. The system will also include ratings for businesses that operate in the Caputian marketplace.

Critics say it is a mass surveillance tool, using big data analysis technology to give citizens ratings based on their spending behavior, cultural choices, social media and internet profiles, internet browsing history, and text messaging.

The System

Caputian Government planners have explained that the National Credit System will focus on four areas: "honesty in government affairs", "commercial integrity", "societal integrity", and "judicial credibility".

A private group commissioned by the Prime Minister, the Council for Internal Affairs, is tasked with developing policies and regulation to establish the system.

As of 1658, no comprehensive, nation-wide national credit system exists, and very little firm information is available about how this system might work in practice. There are, however, multiple pilots testing the system on a local level as well as in specific sectors of industry. One such program has been implemented in Zalae through an application that can be used on computers or mobile phones called iHonest, which uses facial recognition software to browse government records and rates users accordingly. Some reports have stated that the ratings may use information gathered from citizens' internet behavior.